Friday, February 24, 2017

How to copy a file path on a Mac

This is obscure, but I ran across this recently and thought it might help someone else out. I frequently need to copy the path to a file on my Mac or on a server, so that I can include that path in documentation or in a support email with a customer. Here’s how to do it:

1. Select the file you want in the Finder

2. Choose File > Get Info (command-i)

3. Select the full path next to “Where” in the Get Info dialog box

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4. Choose Edit > Copy (command-c)

The file path is now on the clipboard, and can be pasted into a text document or an email. The path will look like this after pasting:

/Users/keithgilbert/Dropbox/Stock/Vector/Open Clipart Library/openclipart-0.18-svgonly/clipart/education

UPDATE:

I just discovered by reading Dan Rodney’s excellent list of Mac Keyboard Shortcuts that if you select a file in the finder and press command-option-c the path name is copied. This method also puts the filename on the end of the path, so in my example above, the result is:

/Users/keithgilbert/Dropbox/Stock/Vector/Open Clipart Library/openclipart-0.18-svgonly/clipart/education/logaritmic_diagram_01.svg

YET ANOTHER UPDATE:

Jamie McKee at MacKey Composition alerted me to this: You can right-click on a file or folder in the Finder, and then hold down the option key and choose “Copy [filename] as Pathname”. 

Wow. I had no idea there were so many ways to do this. Good to know!

 

 

Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Translating print into digital

I’ve worked with the great folks at Experience Life over the last couple of years. Experience Life magazine is available in both a print version as well as for iPhone, iPad, and Android. I was really impressed with how the Experience Life team translated this print layout:


... into this digital layout:




This is a great example of how much better a digital version can convey complex information when it is well-designed and produced correctly. In this case, the short clips of the exercises are best saved as either an image sequence or an animated GIF, depending on the final format of the document (Adobe Digital Publishing Suite, Adobe Experience Manager Mobile, Twixl, Fixed Layout EPUB, Publish Online, etc.)

See also:

How to convert an image sequence to an animated GIF

Place an animated GIF (From the Lynda.com course InDesign: Fixed-Layout EPUB Interactive Techniques & Publish Online)

Monday, December 12, 2016

Upcoming seminar series in Minneapolis: Digital Publishing with InDesign

In cooperation with the Twin Cities Creatives Group, I’m presenting a special January seminar series in Minneapolis about Digital Publishing with Adobe InDesign.

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This is a low-cost 3-session seminar series for graphic designers, production artists, art directors, and other creatives and communicators who want to learn how to create multi-screen, digital output from InDesign CC. You can attend one, two, or all three sessions held on three consecutive Wednesday mornings in downtown Minneapolis.

The fee is $50 per session, or register for all 3 sessions for $130.

If you have any interest in learning how to create digital output for Web sites, Web apps, Mobile apps, or EPUB, be sure to check out the seminar descriptions. I’d love to see you in January!

Monday, November 28, 2016

Scan documents with your phone directly to Dropbox

Dropbox recently added the ability to scan documents directly to Dropbox using the Dropbox app on your iPhone. I’m finding that I use this feature several times a week. Even though I have a Fujitsu ScanSnap iX500 document scanner on my desktop (which is awesome, by the way), the Dropbox app is great for scanning receipts while on the road, or quickly sharing a print document via email or text.

Available only for iPhone at this point (not iPads or Android devices), the app works like this:

1. Download and install the Dropbox app for iPhone

2. Run the app

3. Tap the “plus” button at the bottom of the screen

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4. Tap “Scan Document"

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5. Place your document on a contrasting background, aim the camera at the document, and Dropbox will find the edges of the document. Tap the camera button at the bottom of the screen.

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6. Once the document is captured, you can add pages, perform some basic editing, or rotate pages using the buttons at the bottom of the screen. When done, tap the Next button in the upper-right corner of the screen.

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7. Choose a location by tapping on “Save to”, and then tap “Save"

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8. The result? A PDF, filed right where you want it in your Dropbox storage.

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I was previously using a separate scan-to-pdf app on my iPhone, but I find the Dropbox scanning feature more quicker, easier, and more accurate.

For more info about this feature, see this Dropbox help article.

Are you taking advantage of all that Dropbox has to offer? Take a “deep dive” into Dropbox with my Up and Running with Dropbox course on Lynda.com or LinkedIn Learning.

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Monday, October 24, 2016

Free classes this week!

Now through October 30, ALL training content on LinkedIn Learning is absolutely free –– including my popular Up and Running with Dropbox course, my InDesign Scripting Made Easy course, and more! No catch, no sign-up, no credit-card necessary. Set aside some time this week to #AlwaysBeLearning!

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